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Thread: ★ [Guide] A simple rendering tutorial

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    ★ [Guide] A simple rendering tutorial

    I've noticed a lot of people having trouble rendering an image, so this guide is here to help you understand a few simple methods to obtaining smooth, clean outlines around your render. This guide is intended for Photoshop, but methods 1 and 2 can be done with Paint Shop Pro too.

    The methods go from worst to best. I thought I'd cover all three in case some of you feel more comfortable using a different method to my preferred method.

    This is the image I'll be rendering -- click for a larger view.





    Method 1: Eraser Tool | Rating: Okay

    This method works better if you have a graphics tablet, but it can be done with a mouse and a touchpad if you're careful. Begin by pasting your image into a new canvas in Photoshop, and zoom in. I've zoomed in by 500% for my image.
    Click the eraser tool and select a small, solid brush. Here are my settings.



    Very carefully brush along the outline of your render. It's important that you keep a steady hand with this method, otherwise you're going to end up with a very inconsistent outline.



    Simply do this the whole way around.

    I've now rendered the entire image, and scaled it back down to 100%. I've hilighted the problems I've encountered.



    1. The outline of the hair is very bumpy, which is what we've been trying to avoid.
    2. There was a part of the background between bits of his hair, and after removing it, the eraser left a blotchy effect.
    3. It's difficult getting into the nooks and crannies without causing what happened in error #2.

    So, how can you counter these problems?
    One suggestion is to increase the size of your image by double or triple before you zoom in to begin rendering. When you're done, you'll be able to scale your image back down to its original size. This will help create the appearance of smooth lines, and getting into those nooks and crannies will be much easier.
    Another suggestion, obviously, is to use the smallest size brush possible. Sometimes though, this isn't possible -- obviously if you're already using the smallest size anyway.



    Method 2: Selection Tool | Rating: Great

    Still not my favourite method, but it's good for speeding up the rendering process a bit.
    Just like before, paste your image onto a blank canvas and zoom in. Select the polygonal lasso tool. For a crisper looking edge, make sure there's nothing above 0 in the feathering box.



    Carefully click around your render. Be prepared, because this method's consistency is a lot harder to control.



    When you're done, you'll see the "marching ants" appear around your selection. Go to Select > Inverse, and hit delete. Voila.



    As you can see, the issues I had in the eraser method are gone. The lines look clean and consistent.
    The only problem with this method is that sometimes the lasso will complete the selection even though you're not finished. It's usually the result of accidentally double clicking, but sometimes it happens regardless.
    You also can't take a break with this method. If you try to minimize Photoshop, the selection will complete even though you're not finished.


    Method 3: Pen Tool | Rating: Best

    This is without a doubt my favourite method. You have so much control over this tool, and you can take a break whenever you feel like it!
    Again, paste your image into a blank canvas and zoom in. Using the default pen tool is advised -- freeform, believe it or not, is much harder to control in this case :roll:



    Just like you did with the lasso tool, begin to draw around your image. If you make a mistake somewhere along the line (excuse the pun), just go back to the pen tool menu and choose the delete anchor point pen. Click the little square on the line, and it will vanish.



    When you've finished drawing the whole way around, right click on your canvas and click make selection. Just like before, this will cause the marching ants to appear around your image. Go to Select > Inverse, click delete, and you're done.



    There's really not much of a difference between this method and the lasso method, aside from the fact that you have more control with this one. Remember that with the pen tool, you can also adjust the lines by curving them -- with the lasso tool, you're stuck doing straight lines.

    Try each method and see what works best =] I hope this was of use to you.

  2. The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to Trinket For This Useful Post:

    Cody. (08-12-2012),maxxine (05-02-2012),Ryan~ (05-09-2012)

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    Thank you for posting this!!!

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    You're welcome ^_^ I hope it was of use to you.

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