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Thread: The Value of Instagram, Facebook (social Media) for a business.

  1. #11
    Cinna Rollz Cinnamoroll's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by phantasia View Post
    Ok from most of you I gather that buying followers won't work so scratch that
    @(you need an account to see links) I am a pretty established photographer. I have a studio and have been a photographer for 14 years. 12 years running my own business. The problem is that i am booking more birthday parties 40+ and toddler shoots than weddings. I am struggling to connect with the 13-30 year old that is going to balls and getting married. Even the weddings I do book seem to be older couples. I have a great website. I actually studied graphic design and advertising. I finished my diploma cum laude but Instagram was only created after I graduated.

    I also dont think content creating is the problem. I already had one reel go viral. Although i think it was beginners luck. I only have 6 reels. The conversion to followers just did not happen.
    Part of the reason why I said what I said was because you had said you don't even make $200 per day right now. If you're already well established, great. Spend more time and up your game on social media as suggested by @(you need an account to see links), and be sure to be conscious of your tone in your writing and how you come across.

    Also, the "younger" generation is not "13-30". People under 18 likely will not hire a professional photographer. I think you'd be looking more to appeal to the 20-40 group? Also, a lot of photographers I follow focus mostly on one major area: landscape, nature, wedding, etc. Yes you can do it all, but on social media it seems to be more "successful" showcasing a specific style that you are strong at and can make you stand out. If you look at popular photographers on Instagram, you'll see exactly what I mean by that. Good luck!
    Last edited by Cinnamoroll; 2 Weeks Ago at 09:48 PM.





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  3. #12
    *hair toss*
    Flordibel's Avatar
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    Hey @(you need an account to see links), just FYI I removed your video link for safety reasons - there's a ton of personal information there that can be used to doxx you!
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    Art by (you need an account to see links)!





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  5. #13
    phantasia's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cinnamoroll View Post
    Part of the reason why I said what I said was because you had said you don't even make $200 per day right now. If you're already well established, great. Spend more time and up your game on social media as suggested by @(you need an account to see links), and be sure to be conscious of your tone in your writing and how you come across.

    Also, the "younger" generation is not "13-30". People under 18 likely will not hire a professional photographer. I think you'd be looking more to appeal to the 20-40 group? Also, a lot of photographers I follow focus mostly on one major area: landscape, nature, wedding, etc. Yes you can do it all, but on social media it seems to be more "successful" showcasing a specific style that you are strong at and can make you stand out. If you look at popular photographers on Instagram, you'll see exactly what I mean by that. Good luck!
    Thank you Cinnamoroll . Yeah I try not to write to much in post because people get me wrong all the time. Yeah earning $200 a day here would make you a top earner. OUr minimum lone per day is about $30 a day. So pretty low. My aim in general is to just at least earn $100 a day and that is just one shoot for me and I get that most days. more on weekends so its pretty much my average. Some would say that pretty high earning. Its just stuff from other countries and social media marketing is very expensive for us here.

    The great news is when someone has done a shoot with me they keep coming back. Its just getting them in the door I guess



    Think its small enough not to give away info. Not my actual feed but my July posts and August planned post in canva

    How does it look? I do focus on weddings but put another shoot or two in every now and again. I use to ONLY do weddings and events but after covid... I learned that specializing can sink you. And I started doing a bit more and build a studio during covid. Jip build it myself when we were not allowed out. Dig foundations and everything
    Last edited by phantasia; 2 Weeks Ago at 02:42 AM.

  6. #14
    dustyc's Avatar
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    I agree with pretty much all the advice above! I would also like to add tip I found that helped my Instagram reach was getting rid of inactive followers. I saw a fellow content creator mention that Instagram will only push your posts to a certain percentage of your followers, so you obviously don't want inactive accounts to be included in that fraction of your audience. I don't have a very large following (under 600), but I decided to try it out anyways. I searched my followers for accounts with key phrases like "moved", "deleted", "inactive", "new account", and if it was an account that was no longer being used, I removed them from my followers. And it worked! The next post I made got more likes than usual from my followers. It can be discouraging at first to see your follower count go down, but it felt worth it to me that Instagram was actually showing my posts to more people.
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  8. #15
    Dark_dragonz's Avatar
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    Hi @(you need an account to see links), I should start by saying that I'm not a photographer or an expert in this matter - I'm simply a man sharing my thoughts. I think you should promote yourself, your brand and your services on Instagram, Facebook, TikTok, LinkedIn and your website. On each social media, you should be linking your website in the hopes of increasing traffic.

    Should you buy followers? No! As many people have mentioned before, it's counter-productive. You should prioritise genuine followers who will engage with your content. Real followers may seek your services/recommend your services to people they know. Bots will not!! Honestly, the number of followers isn't everything. People will more likely be judging you based on the content you publish. If people appreciate your work, your following will increase naturally.

    Should you be hiring a consultant? No need - even though it's hard work, you have all the tools at your disposal.

    Should you be running paid ads on social media? Maybe something you can try in the future, but I don't think you should do this just yet.

    Instagram should probably be your top priority - it's the most popular photo and video sharing social media. Hence, it's the best place to publish your work frequently, and arguably, where most people will come across your work.

    You can use Facebook to advertise your photography and for networking. Join the right groups, connect with other photographers and get your name out there. Sometimes great contacts can make a huge difference!

    TikTok is so popular right now, and you can take advantage. Even though it's a video-sharing app, there is a lot you can do to promote your skills and photography. For example, make videos showing your favourite photographs of the month/year, make a video teaching skills/tips, and or capture attention with landscape/travel/food photography. Also, you can use music to your advantage here!

    LinkedIn is great for networking and marketing your professional experience. You mentioned having 10+ years of experience - I hope you are flexing this? Experience is crucial, and people will factor it in. Additionally, having a LinkedIn profile should increase your search visibility and hopefully attract more people to your service.

    Don't forget to interact with your followers, reply to them, show your appreciation from time to time and answer queries. All these things will help grow your professional image.

    One more thing, you may also want to read about SEO (search engine optimisation) and how you could improve your discoverability.

    I wish you all the best!

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  10. #16
    Kibba's Avatar
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    Just as Cinna said, don't buy followers. That actually reflects on your like count
    Having 10k followers and just 60 likes looks sketchy af.

    I think your best bet is paying for adds since instagram unfortunately doesn't show content to people if they're not
    people are not showing skin or beautiful portraits or models.

    Just keep uploading your fluid work and followers and likes will come your way.

    Have a beautiful grid/aesthetic and also upload reels, that's what's selling today

    Kloud the Ryu
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  12. #17

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    I have rudimentary experience in this, but I'll chime in answers, although many are already well answered by others.

    Buying followers is definitely a very immediately short-term benefit, with pretty much no long-term return. Genuine, organic viewership is what comes back time and time again with interest in your work. Bought followers have little to no incentive past the money to stick around long term. It's the same ideology with building any community- why buying followers and subscribers on platforms like YouTube is disliked by most.

    My opinion is: try and span your social media outreach to platforms you think your audience would stay on. If you try and cover every social media site to build your pages on, not only will you burn out quickly just trying to update all of them whenever you have new content, but the return on your invested time shrinks. I would say Instagram (being a dominantly image-based platform) is a good first. If you're looking for more professional or local outreach, LinkedIn is a good place to build on. I personally wouldn't really invest a lot of time on TikTok; despite it being insanely popular, I'd argue that it requires more frequent posting and quite-bite content to stay relevant, and that's a lot of extra work on top of your photography. Twitter can be a good platform for artists too, as long as you avoid getting political and confrontational. I find artists of similar interests tend to seek and find your content, and support each other by retweeting posts, which you can also to do naturally grow.

    If anything, I would invest now in having a clean, minimal and pleasing website to showcase your work. Even if you don't make it yourself, putting a clean gallery front and center shows that you'll take the same care for any photos you take. Nowadays, clean websites are easy to drag and drop with sites like Wix and Squarespace, which also deal with all of the hosting for you.

    Finally, seek to play the long game. It sucks right now not having a boatload of followers and being immediately recognized, and the itch to get the numbers up is strong. However, rush on this part and as mentioned, your audience later will not be organic, and will have no connection to you and will leave just as quickly. Instead of just focusing 100% of your time on your own name, hop out to other people's Instagram, Behance, website pages, etc. and find stuff you genuinely like. Post genuine comments and engage with other communities. Without even having to buy or beg for followers, people will eventually realize that you are a genuine fellow artist and check your content out to engage further. Just remember to cross-link your pages with each other so new people can hop between them easily to join!

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