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Thread: What is your favorite way to study?

  1. #11
    Sephora's Avatar
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    I love reading the tips everyone has posted so far. Here are mine:

    General Tips

    • A good study environment is important. Find a quiet space, good lighting, clear table with no clutter, and sit upright in a chair. I used to study while laying in bed which was a TERRIBLE habit - it was bad for my posture and I would get sleepy.
    • For concentrating, I discovered exercising before studying helps boost alertness. I will walk around to different areas when taking study breaks. If I feel groggy, I will shock my senses by getting a drink or splashing water on my face.
    • I like studying in groups. When I'm not sure about an assignment or the class material, I check with other students in the same class. In high school and university, we used to make Facebook groups or use Group Me app and add everyone in the class. We would all help each other and it was definitely a life saver!


    Subject Specific Tips

    • Math or Computer Science: I find youtube videos explaining how to solve the problem. There are always experts out there who explain it better than my university professor. If I'm stuck on a problem I check Math Exchange, Stack Overflow, Chegg (this is not free), or Google to see if the problem has already been answered online. Don't just memorize answers, practice your approach to the problem.
    • History or Humanities: I make an [Only registered and activated users can see links. ] while reading the textbook and I highlight vocabulary words, important dates, and major themes.
    • English: I will annotate while reading and I also read Sparknotes or No Fear Shakespeare if it's available for the book. If I'm writing a paper, I always read what I wrote out loud and get someone else to read if I have enough time.
    • Foreign Language: I make flash cards and I practice conversations with other students.


    I don't know what subject you are studying but these are the tips I have. I haven't taken a lab science or business class beyond the intro level so I don't have specific tips for those.


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  2. #12

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    Would be helpful to find out what sort of learning style you are.. from memory there are quite a few (e.g visual, auditory, kinesthetic/tactile, reading/writing) I found that I was a reading and writing learner so I would just read things and write notes to study. It also depends on what u are studying - most topics for school can be rote learned (memorised thru repetition). Weird tip but i would easily get distracted so I found that I would study more effectively when I listened to the 999 hour versions of songs on YouTube as it put me in sort of a trance that would help me focus I once listened to 4 hours of “taking the hobbits to Isengard” when studying for my finals

  3. #13
    CharlieWex's Avatar
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    In fact, there are a lot of methods. Personally, I try to take notes. Then I try to explain it in my own words to myself with some examples. And as an extreme method, I just try to apply it in practice, on a specific task. I think you should start with the outlining method. I would write questions in the same outline.

  4. #14

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    Procrastinating for several weeks, scrambling to gather my materials the day before, and then studying for 5 hours straight before college classes start.

    Works every time. 😎 (In giving me a heart attack)

  5. #15
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    I've got extremely bad study habits in that I'll just kinda leave everything til the last week or two then just knuckle down and study/work for like 6+hrs a day. Caffeine and spotify help a lot but tbh scheduling general work/study sessions with your friends and classmates helps a lot. Even if you're not working on the same thing, setting t aside the time has proved to be a tremendous help in the past.

  6. #16

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    I will first say that this probably can't work for everyone. But here is my study/ paper-writing process. It is incredibly idiosyncratic, but feel free to ask why I do what I do for any part of it.

    This technique can be done in as little as 2 days, but ideally should not be longer than a 7-10 days for an average 5-20 single-spaced page research paper.

    Step 1. Read question or write-up prompt. Keep prompt in back of mind.
    Step 2. Read required reading assignments with prompt in back of mind.
    Step 3. While reading. Talk to self, have random ramble like I'm explaining what I'm reading to someone else. (The "Pretend to host a YT cooking video while making the fancy ramen with a scrambled egg and chopped chives at 11pm" approach.)

    Step 4. Slack off for 2-3 days.

    Step 5. Find some outside sources related to the required reading or prompt. Just casually looking to see what other people have said on X-topic. Imagine mock arguments with these authors for missing obvious points or perspectives that you could totally explain better or where their validity checks fall flat.

    Step 6. Hem-and-haw about starting the paper, mess around getting the portal page right. '
    Step 7. Next day. Actually start paper, copy-paste prompt in section 1. Read prompt again. Waste some time with google scholar and then sci hub to pick up some papers in the right date range. Tuck into separate windows on computer screen. Read over their abstracts with prompt in mind.
    Step 8. Read over prompt again, start typing general intro regarding topic of prompt based on the criteria in your rubric (or whatever criteria the prof said they wanted to be met.) [The first paragraph/page is a mini-outline for your whole paper, introducing topic, areas you're going to cover, conclusion you want to reach by the end of the paper.]

    Step 9. Coffee break.

    Step 10. Go back, read what your wrote, spot where you left gaps. Fix those. Realize now the front doesn't fit, fix the front. Read the prompt again, realize you didn't actually answer the prompt with your page and a half of background introduction. Fix that. End up with 10 page paper that goes into depth before getting to your point. Prune or expand as needed.

    Step 11. Coffee break/power nap.

    Step 12. Come back and read paper again. Read prompt again. Doublecheck rubric requirements. Read paper straight through. Does it answer the prompt? If no, fix. If yes, does it meet requirements? If no, fix. If yes, do you like what you wrote? If no, tweak it. If yes, review those google scholar/sci hub papers for where you subconsciously picked up details from, add in-line citations where needed, add references for all papers used.

    Step 13. Read paper again. Are there opinions or facts where you need a citation? If no, continue. If yes, fix, add in-line citations and references at back.

    Step 14. Submit paper that fully answers the prompt in the way you've understood it. Made you learn the concept in detail and has very low risk of creating plagiarism because you went in paraphrasing everything already.

    TL;DR - Read question, Read reading material, let cook in back of head for a day or two, Read question, answer question to yourself in rambly random association way that automatically puts it in your own voice and avoids copying anyone, Refine into correct answer in your own words. Profit.

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