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Thread: Differences between american schools and english schools

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    Red face Differences between american schools and english schools

    Im british and ive always wondered what american schools were like so I have some questions:

    Do you have to wear uniforms in america?
    Is a 'Grade' and equivalent to a year in school?
    Do you have sets or higher grade classes in america?
    Do you have to pay for school?
    What GCSE options can you take?
    What lessons are you forced to do?

    Thank you

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    Yes, some schools do.
    Kind of~ For my state school starts in August, Ends in May. June & July are summer vacation.
    Yes.
    Some schools require payment, but most are free-- public schools.
    Where I'm from, we had EOGE's-- End of Grade Exams.
    Not sure what you mean exactly here, but English, Math, Science, Biology, Geometry, Literature, and Algebra are the basics.

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    What? No love for Canada?
    I'd like to consider the Canadian schooling system to be in-between US and UK, though in reality, it shares an ~80% similarity (my opinion) to the American schooling system.

    From a Canadian perspective:

    1. You may, but it's rare. Usually only restricted to private schools. Never for public and even very uncommon for Catholic schools.
    2. Yes. Most schools do grades K-12 (some jurisdictions go up to 13 here, rare too), much like your British 'years' and 'forms'.
    We don't sub-classify though, it's straight numbering 1 to 12.
    3a. Yes and no. In high school, we are allowed flexibility in choosing option courses, but we have a core set of courses we must take (we'd be dumbasses without).
    Core courses like English, Math, Social Studies/Humanities, and at least 1 of the Sciences.

    3b. If you're talking about those 'optional' higher-level courses like in the UK, where you must take to be considered for Post-Secondary admission, we don't.
    We have more effort-consuming versions of our core courses like AP and IB. But they replace, rather than supplement the cores, and are not much different other than handing out more homework and being marked harder.

    4. Private schools, definitely.
    I can't say with complete certainty for each US State, but generally in the US and CAN, the government subsidizes the majority of public school fees, making it almost free.
    You/your parents pay no more than 5% (and cheap school supplies like pencils and binders), I estimate.

    5. GCSE doesn't exist here.
    You only finish with a High School diploma.
    Some jurisdictions award honors or ceremonial notations to exceptional students, but they don't do anything other than look nice on paper.
    If you do AP or IB however, you'll get an additional certificate and qualification added to your transcript.

    6. The core courses I mentioned previously.
    There are also levels of each subject you may take. If standard-grade English is your weakness, you may be placed in an easier variant of the class (different course name/numbering), while still remaining in the same grade, as the easier variants were still created within grade. But generally, you'll need to complete your cores in standard-grade courses to be competitive to Post-Secondary admission.

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    Do you have to wear uniforms in america? - some schools yes, others no, usually profanity, nudity, violence or drugs/alcohol shirts arent allow. i went to a school that didnt allow camo either.
    Is a 'Grade' and equivalent to a year in school? to a point a grade is how you do in your classes as well as being in say like 9th grade(9 years of school)
    Do you have sets or higher grade classes in america? a b c d f a being best f being worst
    Do you have to pay for school? some schools have book charges and lab fees, others dont
    What GCSE options can you take? i had to take proficiency tests, sats, acts, and the required Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery(military bullshit yo)
    What lessons are you forced to do? had to get a certain number of credits in each field of study, math,science, languages, etc.

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    Quote Originally Posted by georgeboy215 View Post
    Im british and ive always wondered what american schools were like so I have some questions:

    Do you have to wear uniforms in america?
    Is a 'Grade' and equivalent to a year in school?
    Do you have sets or higher grade classes in america?
    Do you have to pay for school?
    What GCSE options can you take?
    What lessons are you forced to do?

    Thank you
    In case you are wondering about the Netherlands too (which I doubt, but still )

    We don't wear uniforms on regular schools, only during gym class.
    Our primary school is for ages 4-12, 'high school' for 4 to 6 years after that, depending on the level. 6 years is A-levels, while the type of education that lasts 4 years could probably be compared with your community college (from what I hear on TV, that is). After 'high school' you go to college, or university in case you passed your A-level exams.
    Yes, we have to pay for school. It used to be affordable but nowadays only the richest people can study after high school. University could cost over 100k euro, excluding renting a room and transportation. Universities here don't have a campus.

    Forced lessons depends on the level of your high school course, in my case (A-levels) it was: Dutch, English, French/German, Latin/Greek, Maths, Gymnastics, some civic and cultural subjects, a general science subject and depending on what sector you chose, either Civic education, economics, geography, history or biology, physics, chemistry and extra maths. And then a few additional obligated (err..) subjects

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