Results 1 to 3 of 3

Thread: Need 10th grade math help! Exponential growth/decay.

  1. #1

    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Gender
    Posts
    855
    Thanks
    214
    Thanked 128 Times in 109 Posts


    Downloads
    37
    Uploads
    0
    Mentioned
    114 Post(s)
    Time Online
    36 d 19 h 35 m
    Avg. Time Online
    28 m
    Rep Power
    6

    Need 10th grade math help! Exponential growth/decay.

    For exponential growth functions:
    a>0 and b>1
    Is: -(1/3)*(3^x)
    still exponential growth? even though a<0
    the function is noted as a(b^x)

    Also, same for decay
    a>0 and 0>b>1
    if a is -1 would it still be an exponential decay?
    decay still is a(b^x)
    Example: -3(2/3)^x

    Would they still be 1) exponential growth and 2) exponential decay?

  2. #2

    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Gender
    Posts
    35
    Thanks
    5
    Thanked 4 Times in 3 Posts


    Downloads
    18
    Uploads
    0
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Time Online
    2 d 17 h 41 m
    Avg. Time Online
    2 m
    Rep Power
    5

    Need 10th grade math help! Exponential growth/decay.

    I'm a little bit confused with the wording on the question...

    The first equation is exponential decay, the second is exponential growth. Is that what your asking?

    So 1. No, it would not still be exponential growth and 2. No, it would not still be exponential decay.
    Last edited by music.speaks; 01-17-2013 at 08:55 PM.

  3. #3

    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Gender
    Posts
    855
    Thanks
    214
    Thanked 128 Times in 109 Posts


    Downloads
    37
    Uploads
    0
    Mentioned
    114 Post(s)
    Time Online
    36 d 19 h 35 m
    Avg. Time Online
    28 m
    Rep Power
    6
    Quote Originally Posted by music.speaks View Post
    I'm a little bit confused with the wording on the question...

    The first equation is exponential decay, the second is exponential growth. Is that what your asking?

    So 1. No, it would not still be exponential growth and 2. No, it would not still be exponential decay.
    I was saying, that since a would be "-1" would the equations still be exponential decay/growth, or what would they classify as?

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •